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Summer Penis Rash Control

Friday, September 8th, 2017

Hitting the beach, going for a hike, mowing the lawn – when summer comes, a guy can’t help but spend a lot more time outside. That’s what the season is for, after all. But along with all the positive aspects of the summer, there are negative ones as well. And for many men, a summer penis rash is among those irritants. Even when a guy is at the top of his penis health game, he may proudly thrust off his trunks to find penis skin that is red, flaky or otherwise unattractive.

With that in mind, let’s look at some of the things a guy can do to help keep penis rash under control as he keeps enjoying the lazy hazy days of summer.

- Go for light colors and light fabrics. One of the primary causes of skin rashes in the summer is sweat from excess heat. This can be especially true of a penis rash, as the double whammy of underwear plus a pair of trousers can significantly up the heat quotient in the crotch. Wearing lightweight pants can help to keep the heat down, as can wearing lighter colors that don’t absorb as much heat. Some guys may also consider leaving off the underwear to stay cooler; that’s one option, but sometimes exposing sensitive penis skin to trouser fabric may cause its own irritation.

- Go loose. It also helps if the clothes a guy wears aren’t quite so tight. Looser pants give a guy a chance to breathe, and keep his basement a little cooler.

- Get out of biker shorts quickly. Compression shorts are great for biking and other sports, but they really raise the heat level – so much so that in the summer they can actively encourage the development of folliculitis. Folliculitis is infected hair follicles which create red splotches that resemble a rash. So dispose of the shorts as soon as possible, and jump into a nice shower for added protection.

- Be careful of pool chlorine levels. Most public pools are maintained at an appropriate chlorine level, but many pools in an individual’s backyard may not be. Too much chlorine can dry the skin out or cause an allergic reaction, both of which can translate into a penis rash in some men. Too little can allow bacteria or parasites to thrive, which can in turn also cause skin eruptions.

- Go to extremes. To keep sweat (and the resulting potential for rash) to a minimum, try to schedule outdoor summer activities at the beginning or end of the day. The heat will be less in the morning or evening than it would be in the middle of the day.

- Choose cleansers. Going to the beach or the pool often involves using the facility’s shower afterward – which may include using their soap and shampoo. When possible, a guy should bring his own, which he hopefully already knows does not cause a penis rash. Harsh commercial cleansers and soaps such as might be in use in a group shower often create penis skin issues.

- Be wary of tanning all over. Nude sunbathing, whether at the beach or a tanning salon, exposes sensitive penis skin to the unfamiliar rays of the sun (or a reasonable facsimile). Burning is the obvious risk, but more limited exposure can also create dryness, which can become flaky and rashy in short order.

Summer doesn’t have to mean a bout of penis rash, especially if a man just takes basic precautions. This includes regular application of a first rate penis health crème (health professionals recommend Man1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin). Healthy penis skin is more resistant to rashing, so choose a crème that will provide a wide range of beneficial vitamins, including A, B5, C, D, and E. While a guy is at it, he should be sure the crème also includes L-arginine. This valuable amino acid helps bolster the process by which penis blood vessels can properly open to accommodate the increased blood flow essential to premium penis activity.

How to Resolve Mold or Mildew on Leather

Friday, September 8th, 2017

What is The Source of Mold and Mildew?

Spores of fungi and bacteria are present in the air. High humidity, warm temperatures, and poor ventilation provide the ambient conditions that allow mold growth. Generally, stagnant air above 80% relative humidity may support mold. If above 95%, the humidity will certainly encourage fungi and bacteria to grow. Soiling, organic residues and stains will enhance the growth of mildew on leather and fabrics.

Removing Mildew from Leather and Fabric Surfaces

First, remove loose mold from outer coverings of upholstered articles with a soft bristle brush. Do this outdoors, if possible, to prevent scattering mildew spores in the house. Wash brush before re-using.

Run a vacuum cleaner attachment over the surface of the leather and fabric panels to draw out more of the mold. Be sure the business end of the vacuum is clean. Remember that the mold spores are being drawn into the bag of the vacuum cleaner. If the vacuum has a disposable bag, remove and dispose of it immediately. If not, empty the bag carefully (preferably outdoors) to avoid scattering mold spores in the house.

Do everything conveniently possible to dry the leather – use an electric heater and a fan to carry away moist air. Sun and air the article to help stop mold growth. Do NOT use a hair dryer or heat gun. Let the moisture evaporate slowly.

If you have finished leather (That is leather with a topically applied pigment coating), and mildew remains, wipe with a pH balanced, high quality leather cleaner applied with a clean damp cloth. It’s best if the cleaner has an anti-fungus agent incorporated. Be generous in application. If you have an unfinished leather, always test in a non-obvious place first. (For more information, check in with a professional leather technician.) If you have cushions with zipper access, and you suspect the fungi or bacteria have migrated into the internals of the cushion, remove the cushion cores and treat accordingly, or replace with new.

If necessary, a final step to remove mildew on upholstered leather furniture is to gently wipe it with a cloth moistened with diluted alcohol (1 cup denatured or isopropyl alcohol to 4 cup water). Let the leather air dry thoroughly. Do not force dry. Be aware that this alcohol solution may adversely affect the top-coat and surface finish of your leather so only do this as a last- ditch effort. It’s always wise to thoroughly test on a hidden part of your leather.

If mold has grown into the inner part of your furniture frame, open the underside dust cover, then dry and air out the internals as best as possible. You may need to send it to a reliable disinfecting and fumigating service. Such services are often listed under “Exterminating and Fumigating” or “Pest Control” services in the yellow pages or on-line. If they have an “ozone chamber,” have them put your furniture into the chamber for at least 48 hours.

Here are some tips on preventing mildew.

Keep The Leather Clean – Soiling can supply enough food for mildew to start growing when moisture and temperature are right. Greasy films, such as those that form on kitchen walls, also contain many nutrients for mildew-causing molds. This is why you should regularly clean your leather with a quality Leather Cleaner.

Get Rid of Dampness – Dampness is often caused by condensation of moisture from humid air onto cooler surfaces. Excessive moisture may indicate that repairs or additional insulation are needed. Replace cracked or defective mortar. Some basements are continually wet from water leaking through crevices in the wall. Make sure outside drainage is adequate.

Control Moisture – For waterproofing concrete and other masonry walls above ground, apply two coats of cement paint, tinted with mineral coloring if desired. Waterproofed coatings to seal absorbent brick and other outside surfaces may be needed. Spread a layer of moisture-barrier material over the soil in crawl spaces under houses. You can use heavy roofing paper or polyethylene plastic film. Good ventilation is important. If possible, do not enclose the crawl space. In extreme cases, a fan or blower may be needed to move the humid air from under the building. Cooking, laundering, and bathing may add 2 gallons or more of water a day to the house. If circulation is not adequate use some type of exhaust fan. If your clothes dryer is equipped with a vent, have it exhausted to the outside to remove moist air.

Dry the Air – Cool air holds less moisture than warm air. Properly installed air-conditioning systems remove moisture from the air by taking up warm air, cooling it (which removes the moisture) and circulating the cool dry air back into the room. In rooms that are not air-conditioned-especially the basement–mechanical dehumidifiers are useful. A humidistat can be attached to the unit to control the humidity. Mechanical dehumidifiers, however, can add heat to a room. If you are using air-conditioners or dehumidifiers, keep windows and doors closed.

Heat – Get rid of dampness by heating the house for a short time. Then open doors and windows to let out the moisture-laden air. An exhaust fan may be used to force it out.

Circulate the Air – When the air outside is drier than that inside, ventilation allows the dry air to enter, take up excess moisture, and then be carried outside. When natural breezes are not sufficient, you can use electric fans placed in a window, set in a wall, or ducted to the attic to move air from the house. Poorly ventilated rooms get damp and musty during continued wet weather, and furniture in such a room is prone to mildew. Try to improve the air circulation. If necessary, lay the furniture on its back, cut open, or remove the dust cover under your furniture and run a fan into the open space to help dry the internals of your furniture. It may help to dry the inside by running a de-humidifier, pointing the air-flow into the internals of your furniture.

Get Rid of Musty Odors – Get rid of musty odors as soon as possible to prevent further mold growth. Usually musty odors disappear if the area is well heated and dried. If the odors remain, the following treatment may be necessary. On cement floors and on tiled walls and floors, get rid of mustiness by scrubbing with a diluted solution of sodium hypochlorite or other chlorine bleach available in most grocery stores. Use one-half to 1 cup of liquid household bleach to a gallon of water. Rinse with clear water and wipe as dry as possible. Keep windows open until walls and floors are thoroughly dry. DO NOT APPLY THIS SOLUTION TO THE LEATHER.